Coal Tattoo

Share This Article
[wp_social_sharing social_options='facebook,twitter,googleplus,linkedin,pinterest' facebook_text='Share on Facebook' twitter_text='Share on Twitter' googleplus_text='Share on Google+' linkedin_text='Share on Linkedin' pinterest_text='Share on Pinterest' icon_order='f,t,g,l,p' show_icons='1' before_button_text='' social_image='']

There’s an interesting report out today from the minority staff (the Democrats) on the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Here’s what the press release says:

Today Energy and Commerce Committee Ranking Member Henry A. Waxman released a new report that compares the climate change voting records of members of Congress in the 112th Congress with the temperatures experienced in 2012 in the districts they currently represent. It finds a widespread “climate disconnect” in the voting records of the Republican members representing the districts most affected by the soaring temperatures in 2012.

“House Republicans are denying the science and disregarding the growing evidence of climate change,” said Rep. Waxman. “The longer Republicans refuse to take action, the more all Americans, including their own constituents, will suffer the extreme impacts of climate change. They are endangering present and future generations by their reckless refusal to listen to the scientists.”

The report finds that Republican members representing the districts most affected by record high temperatures cast anti-climate votes 96% of the time in the 112th Congress. No similar “climate disconnect” was found in the voting records of House Democrats. Democratic members representing districts most affected by high temperatures voted 86% of the time to uphold the Administration’s authority to address climate change or to act to address climate change.

West Virginia shows up in the report in two places. First, there’s this:

The Republican-represented congressional districts with the highest ratio of record high to record low temperatures in 2012 were Ohio’s 4th, West Virginia’s 1st, Michigan’s 3rd, New York’s 19th, Ohio’s 5th, Tennessee’s 2nd, Alabama’s 4th, Virginia’s 4th, Virginia’s 10th, and Georgia’s 3rd. Table 3 lists these ten congressional districts, the member that represents them, and the voting records of these members.

And if you look at that chart, you’ll see that 1st District Rep. David McKinley cast “anti-climate votes” 90 percent of the time. What exactly are these votes. Here’s the general description:

There were 53 climate-related votes on the House floor last Congress, 41 of which were roll-call votes. The Republican members representing the districts most affected by the high temperatures cast anti-climate votes 96% of the time. They voted to overturn EPA’s scientific findings that climate change endangers human health and welfare; to block EPA from regulating carbon pollution from power plants, oil refineries, and vehicles; to prevent the United States from participating in international climate negotiations; and even to cut funding for basic climate science.

And, well, here’s the other mention of West Virginia in the report:

The ten Democratic-represented congressional districts with the highest number of record temperatures were Iowa’s 1st and 2nd, Minnesota’s 7th, New Mexico’s 3rd, Wisconsin’s 3rd, Minnesota’s 1st, West Virginia’s 3rd, Maine’s 2nd, Mississippi’s 2nd, and Colorado’s 2nd. The Democratic members representing the districts with the most record high temperatures voted 79% of the time to uphold Administration authority to address climate change or to otherwise act to address climate change. Only two of the Democratic members representing these districts – Reps. Collin Peterson (MN-7) and Nick Rahall (WV-3) – voted for the anti-climate position more than half the time.

There’s an interactive map online here and the full voting database is here.