Coal’s costs: Here is the study

June 24, 2009 by Ken Ward Jr.

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Hey folks, I have received permission from the journal Public Health Reports to post a copy of the recent West Virginia University study on the costs and benefits of the Appalachian coal industry.

So here it is.

Previous coverage of the study is here, and the transcript of Michael Hendryx’s online chat is here.

10 Responses to “Coal’s costs: Here is the study”

  1. coal says:

    Like I have commented here before, So where is the plan to create all of these new jobs?

    We can do a million studies, but until someone comes up with a workable plan to replace 50% of the power generation in this country, and puts in into operation, we have to mine coal.

    If you are not part of the solution, then you are part of the problem.

  2. […] is a “National Mining Association” number. The most recent study (Hendryx, WVU) shows that coal contributes to about $8 billion in benefits to the Appalachian region. But it also […]

  3. […] is a “National Mining Association” number. The most recent study (Hendryx, WVU) shows that coal contributes to about $8 billion in benefits to the Appalachian region. But it also […]

  4. […] is a “National Mining Association” number. The most recent study (Hendryx, WVU) shows that coal contributes to about $8 billion in benefits to the Appalachian region. But it also […]

  5. […] night.  Despite recent studies [PDF] that prove that mountaintop removal and coal mining have devastated the Appalachian economies and health, cost the coal states more in services than tax revenues, and […]

  6. […] last night.  Despite recent studies [PDF] that prove that mountaintop removal and coal mining have devastated the Appalachian economies and health, cost the coal states more in services than tax revenues, and […]

  7. […] 1. Replace local community with golf course, parking lot, or other “higher use” where mountain used to stand. (Cost to communities: Unquantifiable.) 2. Replace workers; hang out to dry. (Cost to workers: Over 25 years in WV, as coal production grew 75%, jobs were cut in half, and less of them were union.) 3. Neglect to clean up or care for victims. (Cost to Appalachia: From 3,975 to 10,923 “excess annual age-adjusted deaths in coal mining areas”–every year–according to a recent study published in Public Health Reports.) […]

  8. […] Neglect to clean up or care for victims. (Cost to Appalachia: From 3,975 to 10,923 “excess annual age-adjusted deaths in coal mining areas” — every year — according to a recent study published in Public Health Reports.) […]

  9. […] can reasonably claim to create jobs, even if its jobs aren’t abundant or well paid. But a new study reveals that mining projects costs towns more in health bills than they bring in economic growth. […]

  10. […] counties that don’t produce coal, according to this study.  Two other studies, here and here, also show that the coal industry costs government more than it pays in […]

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