Sustained Outrage

Secret meetings, June 17, 2011

There are two meetings in today’s issue of The State Register that violate the public notice requirements of West Virginia’s open meetings law.

The agencies involved? The state Department of Administration’s Design-Build Board and the Bridgemont Community and Technical College Board of Directors.

As we’ve reminded folks before, the West Virginia Open Governmental Proceedings Act requires agencies to send meeting notices to the Secretary of State in time for notices to appear in the State Register five days prior to a scheduled meeting. Every week, we list the agencies that didn’t comply, thanks to the Secretary of State’s office, which kindly marks those agencies with an asterisk in the list of meetings published each Friday in the Register.

Secret meetings, June 10, 2011

This week’s issue of the State Register contains no meetings that violated the public notice provisions of West Virginia’s open meetings law.

As we’ve reminded folks before, the West Virginia Open Governmental Proceedings Act requires agencies to send meeting notices to the Secretary of State in time for notices to appear in the State Register five days prior to a scheduled meeting. Every week, we list the agencies that didn’t comply, thanks to the Secretary of State’s office, which kindly marks those agencies with an asterisk in the list of meetings published each Friday in the Register.

CSB again votes down release of DuPont report

After last week’s sulfuric acid leak at the DuPont Co. chemical plant in Belle, W.Va., you would think the U.S. Chemical Safety Board would move quickly to get its report on the facility out to the public … But you would be wrong.

CSB officials revealed late today that board members have again voted down plans proposed by chairman Rafael Moure-Eraso to hold a public meeting to release the report.

Apparently, other board members had serious problems with the proposed meeting rules suggested by the chairman, specifically the notion that board members could not use the meeting to bring up or discussion anything except the DuPont report.

You can read their comments on the proposal here, but for example, former board Chairman John Bresland called the meeting rules proposal “a heavy handed attempt by the Chairman to deny the other four board members the right to speak their mind on issues of concern to them.”

Secret meetings, June 3, 2011

This week’s issue of The State Register contained no meetings that violated the public notice requirements of the West Virginia open meeting’s law.

As we’ve reminded folks before, the West Virginia Open Governmental Proceedings Act requires agencies to send meeting notices to the Secretary of State in time for notices to appear in the State Register five days prior to a scheduled meeting. Every week, we list the agencies that didn’t comply, thanks to the Secretary of State’s office, which kindly marks those agencies with an asterisk in the list of meetings published each Friday in the Register.

 

Secret meetings, May 27, 2011

We missed last week, so today we’ll take a look at meetings listed in the State Register for last week and this week.

Last week’s Register listed just one meeting that violated the public notice requirements of the state’s open meetings law. The agency? The state Personnel Board.

This week’s edition contained no meeting that violated the public notice requirements.

As we’ve reminded folks before, the West Virginia Open Governmental Proceedings Act requires agencies to send meeting notices to the Secretary of State in time for notices to appear in the State Register five days prior to a scheduled meeting. Every week, we list the agencies that didn’t comply, thanks to the Secretary of State’s office, which kindly marks those agencies with an asterisk in the list of meetings published each Friday in the Register.

Secret meetings, May 13, 2011

Today’s issue of The State Register contains two meetings that violated the public notice requirements of West Virginia’s open meetings law.

The agencies? The North Central Advanced Technology Advisory Board and the Putnam County Community Criminal Justice Board.

As we’ve reminded folks before, the West Virginia Open Governmental Proceedings Act requires agencies to send meeting notices to the Secretary of State in time for notices to appear in the State Register five days prior to a scheduled meeting. Every week, we list the agencies that didn’t comply, thanks to the Secretary of State’s office, which kindly marks those agencies with an asterisk in the list of meetings published each Friday in the Register.

Secret meetings, May 6, 2011

Two meetings in today’s edition of The State Register did not comply with the public notice requirements of  West Virginia’s open meetings act.

The agencies involved? The state Investment Management Board and Workforce West Virginia.

As we’ve reminded folks before, the West Virginia Open Governmental Proceedings Act requires agencies to send meeting notices to the Secretary of State in time for notices to appear in the State Register five days prior to a scheduled meeting. Every week, we list the agencies that didn’t comply, thanks to the Secretary of State’s office, which kindly marks those agencies with an asterisk in the list of meetings published each Friday in the Register.

Secret meetings, April 29, 2011

Today’s issue of The State Register contains no meetings that violated the public notice provisions of West Virginia’s open meetings law.

As we’ve reminded folks before, the West Virginia Open Governmental Proceedings Act requires agencies to send meeting notices to the Secretary of State in time for notices to appear in the State Register five days prior to a scheduled meeting. Every week, we list the agencies that didn’t comply, thanks to the Secretary of State’s office, which kindly marks those agencies with an asterisk in the list of meetings published each Friday in the Register.

Tomblin reschedules Marcellus task force meeting

Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin, acting as governor, has rescheduled the first meeting of his “Marcellus to Manufacturing Task Force” for next week. From the online meeting list at the Secretary of State’s office:

Date of Meeting: May 4, 2011

Time of Meeting: 10:30 AM

Location:

West Virginia Technology Park

2001 Union Carbide Drive Building 2000

Room 1220

South Charleston, West Virginia

The notice also said:

Discuss organizational matters; Review Executive Order No. 1-11 and duties of Task Force; Consideration of matters related to ethane and natural gas extracted from the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia; Discussion of ethane, ethane conversion facilities and ethylene generally; Discussion of available resources in West Virginia that could be utilized to promote investment in ethane to ethylene conversion facilities; Discussion of potential economic impact of ethane conversion facility locating in West Virginia; Formation of Task Force Subcommittees and related matters; Consideration and adoption of meeting procedures; Discussion related to formation of a comprehensive Marcellus to Manufacturing Action Plan generally; Consideration of other matters related generally to the foregoing. An agenda will be available three days prior to the meeting in Room M-146, Office of General Counsel, Office of the Governor, 1900 Kanawha Boulevard, East, Charleston, West Virginia.

UPDATED: Tomblin cancels Marcellus meeting

UPDATED: Just heard from Kurt Dettinger, general counsel for the governor’s office, and he informed me that they’ve called off tomorrow’s task force meeting, citing the inadequate public notice.

“It was determined that we needed to give more notice,” Dettinger said. The meeting will be rescheduled for early May, Dettinger said.

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It’s been more than two months since Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin, acting as governor, created a “task force”  to encourage further development of the Marcellus Shale and to try to lure spin-off industries into West Virginia.

That group appears to be actually starting to get down to work, with a meeting scheduled for tomorrow at the Capitol … Interestingly, the meeting is being billed — and was filed with the Secretary of State’s office — as an “emergency meeting.”

That designation allowed the governor’s office to avoid the five-day-in-advance public notice requirement when the meeting hit the State Register on Friday.

But is this really an emergency meeting?

Under state law, such meetings may be held only when there is some facts or circumstances “requiring immediate official action,” and those “facts and circumstances” must be spelled out in the meeting notice.

In this instance, the task force says it is having an emergency meeting “to discuss organizational matters.”  There is no mention of a need for immediate government action …

The meetings is set for 2 p.m. in the Governor’s Cabinet and Conference Room.