Sustained Outrage

More oil train data – but not for the public

Train Derailment

Survey crews in boats look over tanker cars as workers remove damaged tanker cars along the tracks where several CSX tanker cars carrying crude oil derailed and caught fire along the James River near downtown Lynchburg, Va., Thursday, May 1, 2014.   (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

We talked yesterday about the continuing concerns local residents have over crude-oil train traffic through the Kanawha Valley, and about the latest word from the Federal Railroad Administration on disclosure by railroads to local officials important data about their shipments of this potentially dangerous cargo.

Among other things, we pointed out that the FRA made it clear that railroads like CSX are indeed supposed to continue filing crude-oil shipment disclosures with state emergency response commissions.  But as Curtis Tate at McClatchy reported:

Of the states on the CSX crude oil network that McClatchy sought information from, only Virginia reported receiving an update in the year between June 2014 and June 2015, and that was a week after a CSX oil train derailed and caught fire in February near Mount Carbon, W.Va.

Rob Doolittle, a spokesman for CSX, said the railroad continues to be “in full compliance” with the emergency order. He added that the railroad recently sent new notifications to the affected states, “regardless of whether there was any material change in the number of trains transported.”

When we first checked in with the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management about this yesterday, spokesman T.D. Lively told us that the State Emergency Response Commission had not received any updated material from CSX since an initial notification back in May 2014.

After hearing that from the state, we contacted CSX, sending an email to Rob Doolittle, the same spokesman quoted in Curtis Tate’s story. Initially, Doolittle told us:

We sent updates earlier this month to all states where CSX operates. I’m double-checking to see if there’s any information about the status of the report to West Virginia that is relevant.

Not too long after that, we heard back from Lively with an update from the state:

The SERC just received a call from CSX saying that we should be receiving additional information from them regarding shipments via mail in the next few days.

And then, after that, we got this note from CSX’s Rob Doolittle:

Following your query we checked with the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and confirmed that they had not received the report we mailed earlier this month. We have made arrangements for the report to be delivered tomorrow.

It’s worth noting, though, that regardless of what CSX sends to the state, the public isn’t likely to learn much from it. Lively says state officials are sticking by their position that most of what CSX provides is exempt from disclosure under the state Freedom of Information Act:

This does not change our position on the release of information marked confidential or proprietary by the railroad carrier. The information is made available to appropriate first responders in an unredacted form currently and will continue to be so. As more information becomes available we will release it to first responders.