Sustained Outrage

Oil Train Rules

In this Feb. 17, 2015 file photo, crew members walk near the scene of a train derailment near Mount Carbon, W.Va.   (AP Photo/Chris Tilley, File)

Five months after the huge crude oil train derailment and fire out in Mount Carbon, W.Va., citizens are still concerned about what could have — and what still could — happen as these rail shipments through communities around the country continue. As Matt Murphy reported for the newly consolidated Charleston Gazette-Mail:

Only about 10 residents attended an information session at the Glen Ferris Inn regarding the ongoing remediation efforts surrounding February’s CSX oil train derailment in Mount Carbon.

However, the residents who did attend expressed concern about oil trains continuing to pass through the area in addition to worries over existing oil remnants.

CSX officials made no formal presentation during the meeting. Instead, residents and members of the public were invited to ask questions of railroad representatives at tables set up along the perimeter of the inn’s meeting room.

One Boomer resident, Kay Slayton, said she had concerns over exposure to benzene and other petroleum-related chemicals following the spill, as well as oil remnants in the area.

Slayton’s home is directly across the Kanawha River from the derailment. She and her husband, who were home at the time, witnessed the derailment and subsequent fires occur and evacuated to a nearby elementary school where she works.

“It was a very scary sight,” she said. “I saw something coming down the hill and it was on fire.”

At the same time, the Federal Railroad Administration issued an important notice today, as Curtis Tate reported for McClatchy:

The U.S. Department of Transportation warned railroads that they must continue to notify states of large crude oil shipments after several states reported not getting updated information for as long as a year.

The department imposed the requirement in May 2014 following a series of fiery oil train derailments, and it was designed to help state and local emergency officials assess their risk and training needs.

In a press release, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said:

Transparency is a critical piece of the federal government’s comprehensive approach to safety.  DOT is committed to making certain that states and local officials have the information they need to prepare for and respond to incidents involving hazardous materials, including crude oil.  The Emergency Order that requires these notifications still stands, and we expect railroads to fully comply.

Curtis Tate explained:

In spite of increased public concern about the derailments, railroads have opposed the public release of the oil train information by numerous states, and two companies sued Maryland last July to prevent the state from releasing the oil train data to McClatchy.

The rail industry fought to have the requirement dropped, and it appeared that they got their wish three months ago in the department’s new oil train rule.

But facing backlash from lawmakers, firefighters and some states, the department announced it would continue to enforce the notification requirement indefinitely and take new steps make it permanent.

There have been six major oil train derailments in North America this year, the most recent last week near Culbertson, Mont. While that derailment only resulted in a spill, others in Ontario, West Virginia, Illinois and North Dakota involved fires, explosions and evacuations.

Some readers may recall that West Virginia officials — after initially appearing to be willing to rethink their initial secrecy on this issue — refused a Freedom of Information Act request for data they were given about CSX’s crude oil shipments in West Virginia.