Sustained Outrage

New report details drilling damage to Fernow forest

Foliar injury of trees damaged by aerial release of drilling fluids on May 29, 2008, from the B800 well. Pit containing drilling fl uids is shown in the foreground. Photo taken June 11, 2008. Photo by U.S. Forest Service.

We’ve written before about the problems at the Fernow Experimental Forest related to a drilling gas drilling operation conducted there by Berry Energy (See previous posts here, here and here).

Now, a new report by U.S. Forest scientists details the damage that was done.  ProPublica’s Nicholas Kusnetz first reported on the findings on Friday:

The report traces the construction and drilling of a single well and an accompanying pipeline on a sliver of the 4,700 acre forest that federal scientists have been studying for nearly 80 years. It found that the project felled or killed about 1,000 trees, damaged roads, eroded the land and—perhaps most important—permanently removed a small slice of the forest from future scientific research.

The report said the drilling didn’t appear to have a substantial effect on groundwater quality. The scientists did not monitor the forest’s most sensitive ecosystems, including extensive caves, and did not evaluate the operation’s impact on wildlife. The authors also did not test for any of the chemicals added to drilling and hydraulic fracturing fluids.

The report, and the well in question, hints at a larger story of the tensions that have emerged as drilling expands across federal lands in the eastern United States. The B800 well, as it’s called, drew controversy [2] within the Forest Service when it was planned and approved in 2007. In a letter [3] obtained by the group Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, or PEER, three Forest Service scientists criticized the decision to approve the well, saying it threatened endangered bats and the interconnected caves where they live. The scientists also said the well threatened the long-term research performed in the forest. The employees requested a legal opinion on the matter, but were reportedly rebuffed by their superiors.

The report, whose authors include the three scientists who criticized the decision, notes that some of the scientists’ worst fears, including that turbid water would fill the area’s caves, did not occur. Instead, the greatest impacts of drilling were unexpected. A planned release of wastewater killed scores of trees, and drilling trucks proved much more damaging to the roads than normal logging traffic.