PopCult Rudy Panucci on Pop Culture

Gift Guide: The Creeps Magazine

creeps
Preview-Creeps-04-01The Creeps Magazine is a lovely and affectionate homage to Creepy and Eerie Magazine. Folks of a certain age probably remember these magazine-sized black and white horror comic anthologies that featured intelligent stories and high class art. You could find them on almost any newsstand. Warren Publishing, the folks who gave us Famous Monsters of Filmland, published Creepy and Eerie (and Vampirella and others) from the mid 1960’s into the mid 1980’s.

Now Warrant Publishing is recreating the magic with this now-quarterly magazine that duplicates the look and feel, down to the fonts and newsprint, of the original Warren books.

Preview-Creeps-03-01I’ve raved about these comic magazines since the first issue. In the tradition of “Tales From The Crypt,” these short-form horror stories are loads of fun.

If you have a horror-comic fan in your life, this is the perfect gift. It’s new comic stories, many by some of the original Warren crew, telling all-new tales of horror and weird fiction. The first issue can be had for $19.95, plus shipping, but the three subsequent issues can be purchased for $ 4.95 each, plus shipping. For $29.99 you can subscribe to the next four issues. It’s a great and different gift idea for the comic book-reading horror fan on your gift list.

creepwebd

 

Fright Night Reading: The Creeps #4

The PopCult Bookshelf

Creeps-4The Creeps Magazine #4
written and drawn by various creators
published by Warrant Publishing
$4.95

Just days before Halloween we have a special treat to trick you with. A new issue of the now-quarterly The Creeps Magazine is out. Once again we get a great selection of horror stories by a mix of classic Warren Publishing veterans and new artists and writers.

You may recall that we’ve raved about this book earlier this year and again just a couple of months ago.

A scene from "Night Mare in Nitrate"
A scene from “Night Mare in Nitrate”

Under a cover by Sanjulian, this issue welcomes two more Warren vets to the fold. Artist Bill Black illustrates a ne-page primer on zombies on the inside front cover, while writer Don Glut brings us a very clever spin on a vampire tale, mixed with a little cinematic urban legendry and a few shots at sleazy Hollywood producers. Mansyur Damon illustrates “Nightmare in Nitrate,” which is the first story in the book.

Next up we have “The Goby and The Kraken,” a viking-era sea-going tale written by Nicola Cuti, with art by Jason Paulos that somehow manages to evoke the work of Wally Wood and John Severin at the same time, which is a very good thing. It’s a great story with a nice gruesome twist at the end.

Jason Paulos art from "Goby and The Kraken"
Jason Paulos art from “Goby and The Kraken”

Continue reading…

Frazetta Covers The Creeps

The PopCult Bookshelf

The Creeps #3
written and drawn by various creators
published by Warrant Publishing
$5.95

A few months ago I told you about the first two issues of The Creeps, a great new black-and-white horror anthology magazine-sized comic book. They were a great throwback to the classic Warren Magazines, Creepy and Eerie, using some of the original artists and writers and featuring cover art from some of the classic artists of the Warren era.

Their third issue is another terrific journey through a forgotten form of comics. The cover artist is none other than the late Frank Frazetta, who was THE definitive Warren cover painter. Interior art and story is provided by a mix of Warren veterans like Neal Adams, Rich Buckler, Roger McKenzie, and Alan Weiss with newcomers Artie Godwin, Alex Williamson and Mikael Bergkvist and others.

With the page count increased since the first issue, and the creators finding their footing, this third issue of The Creeps is the best yet. The stories are solid and the art is nearly up to the old Warren standards.

Continue reading…

Get The Creeps

The PopCult Bookshelf

preview2 (1)The Creeps Magazine
Written and Drawn by Various
Published by Warrant Publishing Company
$4.95

What we have here is a lovely and affectionate homage to Creepy and Eerie Magazine. Folks of a certain age probably remember these magazine-sized black and white horror anthologies that featured intelligent stories and high class art. You could find them on almost any newsstand. Warren Publishing, the folks who gave us Famous Monsters of Filmland, published Creepy and Eerie (and Vampirella and others) from the mid 1960’s into the mid 1980’s.

They evenb nailed the fonts for the contents page!
They even nailed the fonts for the contents page!

Warren Publishing was noted for featuring spectacular writing and art, including creators such as Frank Frazetta, Archie Goodwin, Bruce Jones, Richard Corbin, Al Williamson, Steve Ditko, Bernie Wrightson, and many of the other top names in comic books among their roster. Warren ceased publishing in the eighties, but in recent years, other publishers have started publishing new versions of Famous Monsters of Filmland, Creepy, Eerie, and Vampirella. However, Creepy and Eerie, which are currently being published by Dark Horse Comics, are now comic book-sized and printed on slick paper. While they’re both fine books, they just aren’t the same.

Continue reading…

A Heaping Helping Of Creeps

The PopCult Comix Bookshelf

A few years ago I told you about The Creeps Magazine, a wonderful homage/continuation of the classic Warren Comic Magazines, Creepy, Eerie and Vampirella. The Creeps is still going strong and is now available from any comic book store through Diamond Distribution, and can also be found at Barnes & Noble (Books A Million is really missing out on this).

The early issues are getting harder to find, and this August Warrant Publishing, the folks who bring us The Creeps on a regular basis, will be reprinting the best stories from those early issues in their first annual oversized The Creeps Spooktacular. You can order it in advance HERE. It’s also avialable from Diamond Previews, but you’d better let your local comic shop know you want it now. Check out the details in the graphic below…

The Year End PopCult Rant

__mma11-13The PopCulteer
December 29, 2017

Welcome to PopCult’s 684th post for the year 2017. We have two days left in this year before we get to take it out behind the barn and put a bullet in its brain. 2017 has been a demoralizing year on so many fronts that we can’t help by try to be optimistic and think that things will get better in the new year, so let’s hurry up and bring it on. As has been the occasional norm here in PopCult, we’ll end the year with a poorly-organized rant.

2016 was the year of mortality. 2017 has been the year of morbidity as the deaths of famous people continued at a high rate, but we’ve become so numb that many of them don’t even register. This was the year that we discovered that, like many of us, The Grim Reaper always got John Hurt and John Heard mixed up, so he just took both of them to be sure. He had plenty of helpers this year, in Las Vegas and Texas, and with Mother Nature ramping things up with hurricanes.

Politically in 2017 we were only protected from worst-case scenarios by the ineptitude of the elected leaders, who are luckily too incompetent at governing to do actually follow through on much of their horrible agenda. However, they did manage to squeak out a tax bill at the end of the year that will insure that the rich will get richer and the middle class will pay for it. If the GOP couldn’t find a way to help the rich and hurt the poor, they’d lose their financial backing.

Politics cast a pall over much of pop culture in 2017, with consumers so reluctant to spend money that we will see double-digit drops (or close to it) in sales of toys, comic books, movie tickets, music and DVDs. The only glimmer of hope is that sleazy people who deserve to exposed, like Harvey Weinstein, are finally getting a comeuppance that we can only hope eventually extends to the White House.

23569225-mmmainYou can’t talk about pop culture in 2017 without talking about the #Me Too movement and the repurcussions as, after more than a century, Hollywood and the media are finally being held to basic human standards of decency. This is long overdue. When people like Weinstein and Spacey are so blatant about their actions that they have jokes made at their expense on network cartoon shows, it’s way past time to clean house. Exposing the institutionalized sexual harrassment that has been ingrained in show business since day one is long overdue.

It’s a shame that scandals have taken out some creators whose work I like, but we’re at a point where, at least for the time being, we have to have a zero tolerance policy.

I do feel that distinctions need to be drawn about the degrees of offenses, but those distinctions have to be made after the offenses have been called out. What Louis CK is accused of is not as horrifying as what Weinstein is accused of, but it’s not exactly something that needs apologists covering for it, either. Actually it sounds like one of his comedy routines.

If the end result of this soul-searching and house-cleaning is that more women creators get a fair shot to make movies and TV shows without having to sell their souls or bodies, then there’s no way this can be seen as a negative. The only way the #Me Too movement can go South is if it just turns out to be a temporary distraction before everything returns to the status quo, with just a few people made examples of as a way of paying lip service to the concept of equality.

Time will tell is this turns out to be a genuine, much-needed revolution, or if it’s just an orgy of gossip to take our minds off of the current political climate.

cancled-comicsPolitics seems to have infected every area of our lives. Marvel Comics bent over backwards to try and cater to a diverse audience, and was met with rather fierce resistance and a retailer revolt before giving the axe to their Editor in Chief at the end of the year. Just in the last week they announced the cancellation of seven titles (and counting), all of which featured gay, female or minority lead characters.

Rather than simply a political decision, this was motivated by sales, which were pretty bad on the titles that were cancelled. It was a pretty major misstep by Marvel to take shortcuts to diversity in the first place, by simply changing the race/gender/sexual orientation of existing Marvel heroes instead of creating new characters with organic stories.

Even Net Neutrality, which is a no-brainer as a populist cause, is in jeopardy. What’s worse, the usual “Facebook Experts” are out in full force mocking people who are concerned about the recent attack on a free internet by Trump’s FCC.

I know that part of the charm of Facebook is watching how people with little or no grasp of an issue suddenly appoint themselves as experts in what are usually unintentionally hilarious attempts to make themselves look smart, but with the Net Neutrality issue some folks are rising to new heights of demonstrating how a “little knowledge” can be a a dangerous thing. One FB friend actually tried to tie the recent FCC ruling to Suddenlink suddenly offering faster speeds.

This was seriously just too stupid to even comment on. Suddenlink is improving their service because Verizon is considering bringing FIOS to West Virginia. If you want to see how Suddenlink will operate under the new FCC rules remember the two years you spent without access to the Viacom channels, then wonder what life will be like without Netflix.

mst3k-season-11-netflixI don’t want to make it seem like everything was lousy this year. We had some cool pop culture high points like the revival of Mystery Science Theater 3000 (left) and the success of the Wonder Woman movie. In terms of corporate pop culture Disney had their usual success with Star Wars, Pixar and Marvel. Charleston actually got to see some cool independent films, if only fleetingly. We were treated to really cool reissues of great music by The Beatles, Rolling Stones and ELP. Exciting new music, while not selling anywhere near the numbers it used to, was released by Dhani Harrison, Lady J and her Bada Bing Band, Kesha and others. Television, thanks to the proliferation of streaming services, is more robust than ever. And indie comics like The Charlton Arrow, The Creeps and CARtoons Magazine all made the leap into Diamond Previews.

So rather than leave you all feeling depressed because 2017 was so much like it turned out to be, how about we get optimistic about 2018. We have a chance at a poltical reversal. Even in hard times, there’s still cool comics, movies, TV shows, music and toys coming out. Most of all, 2018 can’t be any worse than 2017…can it?

That’s the PopCulteer this week and this year. Let’s hope for a better time in the future. Happy New Year!

Random Items for Friday The 13th

13-facts-you-never-knew-about-the-friday-the-13th-franchiseThe PopCulteer
October 13 , 2017

Today is Friday the 13th, and true to form, your PopCulteer is a bit under the weather. In fact, that’s why there were reruns this week of Beatles Blast and Radio Free Charleston International on The AIR. Three weeks of working 12 to 16 hours a day, seven days a week took it’s toll and I had to slow way the heck down for a bit. We shall soldier on with our normal Friday column, but it’s going to be a series of short items because my brain is still flickering like a flourescent light.

The Bakery Update

The Bakery is the name of the all-ages venue that is under construction now at the former Purity Bread Factory on Charleston’s West Side. I told you about it a few weeks ago. Progress is being made. This week a building permit was granted to allow for demolition and construction to turn the space into top-flight performance area, complete with ADA-compliant restrooms.

The non-profit in charge of all this can still use donations. You can make a cash donation through their Generosity Page, and a novel idea is in the works for those of you who want to make more tangible donations. Shortly The Bakery will have a gift registry set up at Lowes, so that you can purchase the tools and supplies that they specifically need, and donate them directly to the cause. Details are still being worked out on that, and I’ll post links and instructions once it’s all set up and ready to go.

Charleston desperately needs an all-ages venue, and The building desperately needs a major tenant, so this is a match made in heaven.

Drive-in Saturday Night

Don’t forget that Saturday night Ridenour Lake in Nitro plays host to Terror At The Drive-in as part of the Nitro Festival of Fright. I wrote about it HERE. Go read up on it, then go out and enjoy it.

Continue reading…

Chicago and Charlton Neo

img_0070The PopCulteer
April 28, 2017

Some readers have reported technical issues with this edition of The PopCulteer. To try and iron them out, we have moved the photo essay, Linda Vista review and the schedule for The AIR to separate posts and republished these as four different entries. Let’s hope that works. Now on with the PopCulteer:

Your PopCulteer has returned from a quick trip to The Windy City and has a bunch of cool stuff to talk about this week.

Chicago

Your faithful correspondent made the trip to Chicago to accompany his wife to see Linda Vista, the new play by her favorite playwright, Tracy Letts (August: Osage County, Bug, Killer Joe, Superior Donuts), and on this trip we managed to squeeze in visits to a few great record stores for Record Store Day as well as our first-time as a couple stops at The Art Institute of Chicago and Millenium Park. That’s the Crown Fountain you see at right.

image_amtrakswc_markhinsdaleswc3cus580We rode up via Amtrak, and it was one of the most fun train trips we’ve made. Rail travel is such a great alternative to flying that it’s pretty disheartening that there are political leaders in Washington who want to defund Amtrak and eliminate the freedom of choice that consumers who have to travel long distances now have.Rather than killing off the last vestige of long-distance passenger rail in this country, since Amtrak is a government-owned corporation, our country ought to be investing more in Amtrak, upgrading the equipment and increasing the service so that vital lines like The Cardinal could become every day trains.Ridership would go up and fewer people would have to forcibly removed from overbooked airplanes.

Charlton Arrow Kickstarter

arrow-6Our friends at the Charlton Neo movement have a great new Kickstarter campaign for issue #6 of The Charlton Arrow that also includes a replica of the famed Charlton guide to making comics.

Let me quote from the Kickstarter campaign:

In just three years, Charlton Neo has released two dozen books with some of the world’s best and upcoming talent and our flagship title, The Charlton Arrow, is now up to it’s sixth issue! So far, we’ve only been available through mail order in select places, but now it’s time to hang with the big boys and, after this issue, get into the comic shops for increased exposure! It is our goal to raise enough from this Kickstarter for The Charlton Arrow #6 and The Comic Book Guide to afford printing of our next issue and get it into your friendly neighborhood comic shop! Check below for the sensational news of our line-up for our next, first direct issue.

This will be a big move for Charlton Neo, getting the book into comic shops via Diamond Distributors. Recently The Creeps Magazine and CARtoons made the jump into Diamond with great success, proving that great comics can be conceived outside the traditional comic book shop pipeline.

7cd8bb0fb2b79d866960ef471b460679_originalAlso part of this campaign is a reproduction of a book that your PopCulteer wanted badly back in the 1970s, but never managed to get around to ordering, Charlton’s Comic Book Guide for the Artist • Writer • Letterer, Featuring a new introduction by writer Nick Cuti. Again, we quote from the campaign:

Nicola Cuti’s 1973 Comic Book Guide for the Artist • Writer • Letterer from Charlton Comics is an instructional look at the process of comics storytelling. It details a commonsense approach to constructing and drawing comic book stories, even if the tools have evolved since then. Despite changes in technology, the basics that are logically conveyed here remain the same. The Comic Book Guide for the Artist • Writer • Letterer is a rare, sought-after collectible produced by one of comicdom’s most gifted creators, and we at Charlton Neo are proud to re-present it. Take a step back and immerse yourself in the state-of-the-art tools and techniques of 1973, courtesy of Nicola Cuti and the Charlton artists!

This brief campaign has already hit its goal, and there’s still about a week left to go. I’ll be kicking in shortly, as should you. I would have told you about it sooner, but I was in Chicago when it started. Check out the widget:

Check the three other posts for this week’s full PopCulteer. PopCult will still be here every day. Keep checking back.

 

img_0070The PopCulteer
April 28
, 2017

Your PopCulteer has returned from a quick trip to The Windy City and has a bunch of cool stuff to talk about this week.

I’m going to try and keep it short, but chances are that I won’t succeed.

Chicago

Your faithful correspondent made the trip to Chicago to accompany his wife to see Linda Vista, the new play by her favorite playwright, Tracy Letts (August Osage County, Bug, Killer Joe, Superior Donuts), and on this trip we managed to squeeze in visits to a few great record stores for Record Store Day as well as our first-time as a couple stops at The Art Institute of Chicago and Millenium Park. That’s the Crown Fountain you see at right.

image_amtrakswc_markhinsdaleswc3cus580We rode up via Amtrak, and it was one of the most fun train trips we’ve made. Rail travel is such a great alternative to flying that it’s pretty disheartening that there are political leaders in Washington who want to defund Amtrak and eliminate the freedom of choice that consumers who have to travel long distances now have.

Rather than killing off the last vestige of long-distance passenger rail in this country, since Amtrak is a government-owned corporation, our country ought to be investing more in Amtrak, upgrading the equipment and increasing the service so that vital lines like The Cardinal could become every day trains.

Ridership would go up and fewer people would have to forcibly removed from overbooked airplanes.

Charlton Arrow Kickstarter

arrow-6Our friends at the Charlton Neo movement have a great new Kickstarter campaign for issue #6 of The Charlton Arrow that also includes a replica of the famed Charlton guide to making comics.

Let me quote from the Kickstarter campaign:

In just three years, Charlton Neo has released two dozen books with some of the world’s best and upcoming talent and our flagship title, The Charlton Arrow, is now up to it’s sixth issue! So far, we’ve only been available through mail order in select places, but now it’s time to hang with the big boys and, after this issue, get into the comic shops for increased exposure! It is our goal to raise enough from this Kickstarter for The Charlton Arrow #6 and The Comic Book Guide to afford printing of our next issue and get it into your friendly neighborhood comic shop! Check below for the sensational news of our line-up for our next, first direct issue.

This will be a big move for Charlton Neo, getting the book into comic shops via Diamond Distributors. Recently The Creeps Magazine and CARtoons made the jump into Diamond with great success, proving that great comics can be conceived outside the traditional comic book shop pipeline.

7cd8bb0fb2b79d866960ef471b460679_originalAlso part of this campaign is a reproduction of a book that your PopCulteer wanted badly back in the 1970s, but never managed to get around to ordering, Charlton’s Comic Book Guide for the Artist • Writer • Letterer, Featuring a new introduction by writer Nick Cuti. Again, we quote from the campaign:

Nicola Cuti’s 1973 Comic Book Guide for the Artist • Writer • Letterer from Charlton Comics is an instructional look at the process of comics storytelling. It details a commonsense approach to constructing and drawing comic book stories, even if the tools have evolved since then. Despite changes in technology, the basics that are logically conveyed here remain the same. The Comic Book Guide for the Artist • Writer • Letterer is a rare, sought-after collectible produced by one of comicdom’s most gifted creators, and we at Charlton Neo are proud to re-present it. Take a step back and immerse yourself in the state-of-the-art tools and techniques of 1973, courtesy of Nicola Cuti and the Charlton artists!

This brief campaign has already hit its goal, and there’s still about a week left to go. I’ll be kicking in shortly, as should you. I would have told you about it sooner, but I was in Chicago when it started. Check out the widget:

23766_show_portrait_largeLinda Vista

Our main reason for going to Chicago was to see Linda Vista, the new play by Tracy Letts, at Steppenwolf, the place where your PopCulteer got married. This story of a middle-aged white guy trying to resurface after falling into the deep end of the pool of bad life choices is probably the most laugh-out-loud funny thing that Letts has written. It’s still touching and poignant with a relevant subtext, but it’s also funny as hell.

Linda Vista, billed as “An Adult Comedy about Immature Behavior,” tells the story of Wheeler (Ian Barford), a 50-year-old under achiever who’s just moving out after spending two years sleeping on a cot in the garage of his estranged wife’s house. Wheeler is smart, funny, charming and also confused by the changing world around him. He works in a dead-end job as a camera repairman and early in the play finds himself on a blind date with a “life coach,” named Jules (Cora Vander Broek), with whom he begins a relationship.

Without going into too much plot detail, Wheeler manages to screw things up one month into that relationship, and winds up as half of a doomed couple with the much younger, pregnant Vietnamese-American Rockabilly chick, Minnie (Kahyun Kim). His longtime college buddies (Tim Hopper, Sally Murphy) are somewhat horrified by his actions, and as his world falls apart he finds himself dealing with miserable developments with his wife and son and melts down at work.

lindavista

Because I don’t want to write a book about this play, just let me say that it was spectacularly performed and exqusitely written. There were no weak links in the cast with every performer perfectly capturing the essence of their role and Barford making “Wheeler” a very real entity. The story evoked a “there but for the grace of God go I” feeling in me as it put Wheeler through the paces of what seemed like a cross between a “Make Your Own Adventure” book and “Cards Against Humanity.” The audience really, really comes to like Wheeler and root for him, and he keeps making the worst possible decisions. There is a hint of redemption at the end, just to keep the play from being so realistic that it becomes depressing.

Continue reading…

The 2016 PopCult Gift Guide Master List

giftguide-graphic-004The PopCulteer
December 16
, 2016

Okay, this was quite an undertaking. The 2016 PopCult Gift guide comprised over 130 gift suggestions in over 100 posts, spread out over just a bit more than a month. Your PopCulteer spent months choosing unique and particularly nifty gift suggestions with the goal of telling about things that other gift guides didn’t know about.

This was a beast of a list to compile. Once I got into the actual writing, editing and posting, I realized that I would have to compose close to 40,000 words…and that I had two week-long trips scheduled during the time I usually assemble the list. Needless to say, this was a huge job, made even hugerer by the fact that I had to write two week’s worth of posts ahead of time so that I could get out of town.

salt-coverSo now this list is in the books, and PopCult should return to whatever passes for normal around here. Our regular features will still be here over the weekend. We’ll be bringing you plenty of updates on The AIR, our internet radio station (currently playing holiday music, go check it out!), and starting Monday I’ll be posting photo essays that cover the two trips I made in the last month.

That should take us to next Friday, easy. I may even try to neak in a new video episode of Radio Free Charleston before the end of the year.I hope you enjoyed the list. Feedback on social media indicates that this may be my best-received PopCult Gift Guide yet. Below is the master index. Keep in mind, if you are ordering something through the mail, act fast! Today is pretty much the last day that you can reasonably expect to order something and get it in time for Christmas or Hannukkah.Enjoy, and have a great holiday season!

The 2016 PopCult Gift Guide Master Index

61lyjfw78xlBooks

The Amazing Toys of Marvin Glass
Celeste Giuliano’s Pin-ups in 3-D
The Battle of Charleston
Rain No Evil
Mitch O’Connell’s Tattoos Volume II
TV’s Frank on MST3K
Maido: A Guide To Japanese Gestures
Pinball Wizards and Blacklight Destroyers
The Daily Show (The Book)
Heavy Metal Pizza Party (Crime Cats)
Portraits of The Legends of Comics
411ic6pengl-_sy400_bo1204203200_2Create: Art Collaborations In NYC
VISCERAL The Art of Jason Edmitson
Steppenwolf Theatre Company In Their Own Words
Big In Japan II
Call of Cthulu for Beginning Readers
Stroker: The Artistic Works of Tom Medley
Ink ‘N Guys

Music

annmagnuson5Progressive Rock from Prognosis
Swing Music from The Swing Shift
New Wave Picks from Sydney’s Big Electric Cat
Diablo Blues Band
Dream Girl by Ann Magnuson
Kate Bush Before The Dawn
Todd Rundgren Live
Pete Townshend’s Deep End Live
Phantom of the Opera Remastered
ws_bannerfeastEight Days A Week: The Beatles-The Touring Years
Art and Music by The Punk
Under Surveillance “Awakening:”
Todd Burge  “Live on Mountain Stage”
Larry Groce  “Live Forever”
Spencer Elliott  “Unspoken
harrah2HARRAH “HARRAH”
Superfetch  “Maximum Penetration (Live)”
Hurl Brickbat  “The Stamp EP”
Crazy Jane “(the green disc)”
Miniature Giant  “Terrible People”
Kerry Hughes  “Battleground’s Theater”

Toys

2016 Hess Toy Truck and Dragster
50570161AZIAM Yoga Toys
Lionel Mega Tracks
Terra Climber
I AM Elemental
Mensch on a Bench
Cabbage Patch Kid Baby So Real
Xtreme Cycle Moto Cam
Adoptimals
91irosjq4ll-_sl1500_My Fairy Garden
Peppy Pups
Lammily
Greenlight Collectible Cars
LEGO Yellow Submarine
Hot Wheels Ai Racing System
DC Superhero Girls
The Amazing Toys of Marvin Glass
Johnny West Horses
Cabbage Patch Big Kids

cov1finaaaalComics

SALT
The World of Edena
The Fifth Beatle (Expanded Edition)
Super Weird Heroes
Charlton Neo Comics
Tiki Zombie Bundle
The Creeps Magazine
CARtoons
Call of Cthulu for Beginning Readers
Stroker: The Artistic Works of Tom Medley
Cemetary Plots
71rjdhzgazl-_sx522_Forbidden Gallery

Games

Celebrity Name Game Home Edition
Noel Shuffle
Captain Action Card Game
Stratego Waterloo Edition

a15c-0hm2rl-_sl1500_Video

Phantom of the Opera Remastered
Eight Days A Week: The Beatles-The Touring Years
The Cruel Tale of the Medicine Man
Todd Rundgren Live
Pete Townshend’s Deep End Live
The Secret Life Of Pets

Accessories

Aquabats Power Watch
That Pillow

bpm038-cover-full_8Magazines

The Charleston Anvil
The Creeps Magazine
CARtoons
Non Sport Update
Zelda
Bachelor Pad Magazine
TCM Now Playing
Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street

Art

61fvh639hcl-_sx373_bo1204203200_HepCatz
The Art of Glen Brogan
Art and Music by The Punk
Mitch O’Connell’s Tattoos Volume II
Pinball Wizards and Blacklight Destroyers
Portraits of The Legends of Comics
2Create: Art Collaborations In NYC
VISCERAL The Art of Jason Edmitson

Food

Eat Local
Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street

oddbird001Shopping

Oddbird Gift Emporium
Shop Local

Theatre

15289327_10154717447048077_5992974578549900742_oMARY
Musical Theatre Gifts from Curtain Call
“Worst Christmas” at The Alban
Steppenwolf Theatre Company In Their Own Words
A Christmas Story: The Musical
Black Nativity

Pop Culture Themes

Batman ’66
Star Wars
Star Trek

ys-001Stuff You Need

Roku
Toydriver
Picks from On The Road with Mel

Check back for our regular features and tons of photos and we attempt to take it easy going into the holiday. .