Rep. David McKinley on EPA chief’s departure: ‘I don’t want a repeat of what happened in Libya’

January 4, 2013 by Ken Ward Jr.

When I wrote yesterday about West Virginia political leaders and their response to the departure of Obama EPA chief Lisa Jackson, I noted that Rep. Shelley Moore Capito looked pretty silly when she compared the administration’s regulatory efforts to “a punitive imperialistic hammer.” Well, it turns out that’s nothing … check out what fellow West Virginia Republican David McKinley told Greenwire (subscription required – thanks to John Walke at NRDC for tweeting about this) about whether Jackson’s leaving will change the regulatory landscape at EPA:

I don’t want a repeat of what happened in Libya when we helped topple [Muammar] Gadhafi and then we wound up having al-Qaida.

The story continues:

Asked to clarify, McKinley said, “I’m saying sometimes the known is better than unknown. Let’s make sure that we have the right person [at EPA]. And let’s see whether we want to go to the mat against them; maybe it’s someone we can work with.”

Maybe the known is better than the unknown. But comparing Lisa Jackson to a brutal dictator who, among other things, was linked to the deaths of 270 people in the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am jet over Lockerbie, Scotland? Seriously?

4 Responses to “Rep. David McKinley on EPA chief’s departure: ‘I don’t want a repeat of what happened in Libya’”

  1. Ralphieboy says:

    I’m sure that representatives McKinley and Capito would like nothing better than an EPA administrator that rubber stamps anything the coal industry wants to do. I trust that the president is not that stupid.

  2. edd442 says:

    Unbelievable and shameful that this man would hurl such an insult. Absolutely a disgrace, and I am embarrassed as an American.

  3. Bo Webb says:

    In the category of displays of ignorance this is a winner.

  4. Laura Antrim Caskey says:

    For people like Representative McKinley, all the controversy about enforcing regulations on coal extraction and coal burning come down to money and power.

    For us, the people who live in the beautiful abundant Appalachian Mountains, all this controversy about enforcing regulations on coal extraction and coal burning come down to our lives. Our lives depend upon proper regulation.

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